7/19/2021

THE ONE INDISPENSABLE KEY THAT WILL SAVE AMERICA

 

America’s Founders believed only a religious and moral people to be capable of enjoying freedom. An irreligious and amoral people, they believed, would turn freedom into lawlessness and anarchy. They agreed with William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania, who said, "Those who will not be governed by God must be ruled by tyrants."

This is why George Washington, in his 1796 Farewell Address, urged the new nation to maintain "religion" and "morality," which he called "indispensable" supports for national prosperity. Interestingly, Washington did not see religion  as something to be "tolerated," but as something "indispensable" for the life of the nation.

In this same Address, Washington called religion and morality “those great pillars of human happiness” and he warned against indulging the supposition that morality could be had apart from religion. “Both reason and experience,” he said, “forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”

By "religion" Washington meant Christianity, and like the other Founders, he believed that only Christianity provided the intellectual and moral underpinnings for a stable and prosperous society. John Adams made this clear in a 1798 speech in which he said, “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.”

It was for this same reason that Benjamin Franklin refused to print Thomas Paine’s book, The Age of Reason, in which he attacked orthodox Christianity. After reading Paine’s manuscript, Franklin suggested that he burn it and then exclaimed, “If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be if without it” (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 138).

Indeed, the Founders believed that the teachings of Jesus and the New Testament would awaken the best in the human heart and be a constraining force on the baser elements of human nature. This is why Benjamin Rush, member of the Continental Congress and signer of the Declaration of Independence, declared,

The only foundation for a republic is to be laid in Religion. Without this there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 163).

The opening clause of the First Amendment says, ” Congress shall make no law concerning the establishment of religion nor hindering the free exercise thereof.”  This was not a rejection of religion, for the day after ratifying the First Amendment, those same Founders proclaimed a national day of prayer and thanksgiving.

The First Amendment merely blocked Congress from ever establishing a European-style, official state church. The First Amendment actually created in America a free and open marketplace for the exchange and propagation of religious ideas and teachings without government interference.

The Founders believed such religious liberty to be necessary for a stable and prosperous society. Two weeks before signing the Declaration of Independence, John Adams wrote to his cousin, Zabdiel Adams, a minister of the Gospel, and said,

Statesmen, my dear Sir, may plan and speculate for Liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand (Hyatt, 1726:The Year that Defined America, 164).

Fast forward to 2021 and we find America rejecting the very things her Founders said would preserve her. Crosses and Christian symbols have been systematically removed from public properties. Prayer and Bible reading have been banned from public schools. In 2019 the Democrat National Committee (DNC), the party of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, unanimously passed a resolution affirming atheism and declaring that neither Christianity nor any religion is necessary for morality or patriotism.

Can America recover from this onslaught of secularism, socialism, and amorality? It can, but it will not come through another church program, a new church order, or the next election. Only another Great Awakening will save America by restoring those "indispensable" characteristics of religion and morality identified by her Founders.

We can expect such an Awakening for it is part of our national heritage. The First Great Awakening, for example, morally transformed Colonial America, broke down regional and sectarian barriers, and prepared the 13 Colonies for statehood. The Second Great Awakening saved America from Deism and the negative influences of the French Revolution. The Great Prayer Awakening of 1857-58 sustained her through a devastating Civil War. Another Great Awakening carried America through the turbulent 1960s-70s.

For contemporary America to be saved from this present onslaught of socialism, secularism, and Marxism, another Great Awakening is a must. Such an Awakening, however, cannot be planned, strategized, and organized; it must be birthed in agonizing prayer. Such an Awakening is the "one indispensable key" that will save America, and this key is in your hands and mine.

Dr. Eddie L. Hyatt is the author of Abolitionist Founding Fathers and 1726: The Year that Defined America from which the above article has been derived. These books are available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com. To schedule Eddie to speak to your congregation or fellowship on this or another topic, send an email to dreddiehyatt@gmail.com.

 


7/13/2021

CRITICAL RACE THEORY AND THE BIBLE ANSWER

Critical Race Theory is defined by its name. For proponents of this new and novel theory, race is everything and “critical” for interpreting all of life, particularly American life. According to CRT, race is what defines you, labels you, and determines your worth and your role in society.

This, of course, is rooted in Marxist ideology, which seeks to divide and conquer by dividing people into groups—the oppressed and the oppressors—and pitting them against one another.

Classic Marxism sought to divide nations on the basis of economics, pitting the bourgeoisie (wealthy land and factory owners) against the proletariat (the peasants and laborers who did the work). By labelling these groups as the oppressed and the oppressors, and pitting them against one another, Marxists were able to gain control of nations where there was a huge gap between the rich and the poor.

Classic Marxism, however, was never able to make much headway in the United States because of the large, prosperous middle class. They, therefore, have sought for another approach for creating division and they believe they have found it in the presence of slavery and racial inequity in America’s history, which they are seeking to exploit.

In this new American Marxism, if you are white, you are an oppressor and victimizer. If you are a person of color, you are an oppressed victim. By racial labelling and profiling, the American Marxists hope to divide and conquer and thereby take control of America.

To achieve their goal, Marxists also know they must convince a significant portion of the population that the America of Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln is an evil, oppressive system that was founded on racism and slavery. Hence the attack on America’s founders, the toppling of their monuments, and the removal of their names from schools and other public buildings.

Sadly, Critical Race Theory has gained widespread acceptance among the academic and Hollywood elite and with many politicians in Washington D.C. School children are now being taught that America is an evil nation founded on white supremacy.

Dr. King Opposed to CRT

Critical Race Theory (CRT) is diametrically opposed to the vision of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of a colorblind society where people are judged by the content of their character, not by the color of their skin. For proponents of CRT, race determines everything while character is relative and therefore meaningless.

Neither can proponents of CRT say with Dr. King that their dream is “deeply rooted in the American dream.” They, in fact, hate America. In their warped thinking, the Civil Rights Movement, led by Dr. King, was a useless, meaningless expenditure of time and energy because it did not seek to destroy the evil, American system.

The Bible Answer

Dr. King’s vision of a colorblind society was rooted in the New Testament vision that Paul articulated in Galatians 3:28. Paul’s conversion experience was so radical that he came into an entirely new value system “in Christ,” which completely undermined the old value system that judged people on the basis of race, class, and gender. Paul delineated this new value system in his letter to the Galatians. He wrote,

For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus (Galatians 3:27-28).

Paul is not saying that these distinctions of sex, race, and class, no longer exist, but that they must never be used as value judgments concerning a person’s worth or role in society. This was revolutionary in the ancient world where slavery was everywhere and affected people of all races and ethnicities.

Some New Testament scholars believe Galatians 3:27-28 was part of a baptismal formula that all baptismal candidates were required to repeat. This meant that, for those earliest disciples, this new value system was a part of the basics of what it meant to be a Christian.  

This new value system raised the dignity of women and slaves in the ancient world. As a result of this new value system “in Christ,” slaves and masters worshipped together, and in some situations, slaves became pastors of congregations in which their masters worshipped. This value system, of course, led to the collapse of slavery everywhere it was embraced and lived out.

The Key for Racial Harmony Today

It was this Christian value system, emphasized in the Great Awakening (1726-70), that turned much of Colonial America against slavery, including America’s founding fathers. It led to America’s founding documents being colorblind with no classifications based on race or skin color and no mention of slaves or slavery (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 53-57)

This occurred at a time when slavery was accepted and practiced in most of the world. As Dr. Thomas Sowell said, “You could research all of 18th century Africa or Asia or the Middle East without finding any comparable rejection of slavery there” (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 9).

Another "Great Awakening," that emphasizes the teachings of Jesus and the New Testament, would do more than anything to bring about racial and social harmony and preserve our freedoms for the next generation.

Dr. Eddie Hyatt is the author of Abolitionist Founding Fathers and 1726: The Year that Defined America, which document how a great spiritual awakening gave birth to the United States of America and sparked an abolition movement that eventually brought about the end of slavery on the American continent. These books are available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.

7/09/2021

WHY DR. KING WOULD REJECT CRITICAL RACE THEORY AND THE 1619 PROJECT

It is clear from the writings and speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that he would be opposed to Critical Race Theory and the 1619 Project. For while proponents of these theories seek to demonize America and her founding documents, Dr. King saw Divine Providence at work in America's founding and he sought to build his work on that original American dream.

For example, writing from the Birmingham city jail in April of 1963, Dr. King expressed confidence that his fight for racial justice would succeed for two reasons: (1) the “sacred heritage” of our nation and (2) the eternal will of God embodied in his demands.

In the same letter, Dr. King declared that one day the South would realize that he and others of the Civil Rights movement were, in fact, “Standing up for the best in the American dream and the most sacred values in our Judeo-Christian heritage.”

A "heritage" is an inheritance. It is a valued legacy that one generation leaves to the next. A "sacred" heritage is one that has something of the Divine embodied in it. Dr. King obviously believed that there was something godly and Providential in America's founding, hence his use of the phrase "sacred heritage." 

Dr. King knew that the early immigrants to this land were persecuted Christians who had come here with a dream for a land where they could live out their faith without government interference. He also knew that a “Great Awakening” had morally transformed the founding generation and turned the founders against slavery at a time it was practiced throughout the world. This is what Dr. Thomas Sowell was referring to when he wrote,

Among those who turned against slavery in the 18th century were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and other American leaders. You could research all of 18th century Africa or Asia or the Middle East without finding any comparable rejection of slavery there (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 9).

The American dream of a land of faith and freedom is the “sacred heritage” of which Dr. King spoke. He believed that America’s founders had left this “sacred heritage” of faith and freedom to succeeding generations, and knowledge of this heritage was a source of hope and confidence for him in his struggle for civil rights.

Dr. King expressed this belief in America’s “sacred heritage” in his iconic “I Have A Dream” speech. Speaking from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, he declared, “I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.” Expressing deep respect for America’s founding documents, he went on to say,

“When the architects of our Republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

Then quoting from the words of the Declaration of Independence, he proclaimed,

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

For Dr. King, the problem was not with our founders and their founding documents. The problem was that Americans of succeeding generations were not living up to the ideals of faith and freedom expressed in those founding documents.

Make no mistake! Those who are pushing the 1619 Project and Critical Race Theory have rejected Dr. King, America’s founders, and America's founding documents. They have naively thumbed their nose at the “sacred heritage” on which Dr. King built his work and which made America, perhaps, the freest and most prosperous nation in human history,

Dr. Eddie Hyatt is an author and ordained minister with over 50 years of service as a pastor, teacher, and professor of theology. This article is derived from his latest book, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.

7/08/2021

WHY THIS GENERATION MUST GUARD THE "SACRED HERITAGE" IT RECEIVED

Writing from the Birmingham city jail in April of 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. expressed confidence that his fight for racial justice would succeed for two reasons: (1) the sacred heritage of our nation and (2) the eternal will of God embodied in his demands.

In the same letter, Dr. King declared that one day the South would realize that he and others of the Civil Rights movement were, in fact, “Standing up for the best in the American dream and the most sacred values in our Judeo-Christian heritage.”

Dr. King obviously believed that America’s founders had left a “sacred heritage” to succeeding generations, and knowledge of this heritage was a source of hope and confidence that his struggle for civil rights would succeed.

A heritage is an inheritance. It is a cherished legacy that one generation leaves to the next. And a “sacred heritage” is one that is embodied with that which is holy and Divine.

I am convinced that this “sacred heritage,” of which Dr. King spoke, has two components that I will highlight here today. They are: (1) Faith in God and (2) Love of liberty.

Indeed, the earliest immigrants to this land were people of faith who came here to escape the tyranny of an oppressive state and an oppressive state church. They believed that God providentially guided them to this land, which they envisioned as a land of freedom for all oppressed peoples.

This is the “sacred heritage” to which Dr. King referred and that is embodied in the following people, movements, and documents.

The Pilgrims (1620)

Dr. King spoke fondly of the Pilgrims and probably had them in mind when he referred to the nation’s “sacred heritage.” We normally think of religious persecution as the Pilgrims’ reason for fleeing England and carving out a new life in the New World. Fleeing persecution, however, was not their only reason.

In the Mayflower Compact, the Pilgrims gave a proactive two-fold reason for their move to America in 1620. They had come, they said: (1) for the glory of God and (2) for the advancement of the Christian faith.

Although they were not the first to settle in the New World, the Pilgrims’ experience has captured the imagination of the American public more than any of the early immigrants to these shores. This, no doubt, is because of their deep faith in God, their love of liberty, and their willingness to risk it all for their vision of a free and godly society. They, no doubt, were in Dr. King’s mind when he spoke of this nation’s “sacred heritage.”

The United Colonies of New England

By 1643, thousands of new immigrants had arrived in New England and new towns and colonies were springing up. Sensing a need for some sort of central government that would arbitrate boundary disputes and facilitate a mutual defense, they formed they United Colonies of New England.

The United Colonies of New England was a federalist system in which each colony retained its autonomy and the powers of the central government were limited by the constitution, which they formulated. The opening statement of their constitution explains why they had come to the New World. It reads,

Whereas we all came into these parts of America with one and the same end and aim, namely to advance the kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ and enjoy the Liberties of the Gospel in purity and peace (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 31).

The faith of these early immigrants in God and their love for Liberty make them also a part of that “sacred heritage” to which Dr. King referred and which me must stand on guard to preserve.

The Great Awakening (1726-70)

After a time of moral and spiritual decline among the descendants of the Pilgrims, Puritans, and other early immigrants, a great, spiritual awakening began in 1726 that morally transformed Colonial America. Dubbed the “Great Awakening” by historians, entire towns repented and put their faith in Jesus Christ.

One of America’s Founding Fathers, Benjamin Franklin, described the transformation that came over his hometown of Philadelphia when the Awakening arrived there in 1739. He wrote,

From being thoughtless or indifferent about religion, it seemed as if all the world were growing religious so that one could not walk through the town in an evening without hearing psalms sung in different families of every street (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 14).

In fact, so transforming was the Awakening, that a British official in America wrote to his superiors in England and said, “If you ask an American who is his master, he will tell you he has none, nor any governor but Jesus Christ.”

In this revival, racial and cultural barriers were broken down as the Gospel was shared with all people regardless of race or social standing. In addition, blacks and whites worshipped together as the fires of revival burned up and down the eastern seaboard.

Having studied America’s founding, Dr. King knew of the Great Awakening and it was surely in his mind when he spoke of America’s “sacred heritage.”

An Anti-Slavery Movement Emerges from the Awakening

Out of the Great Awakening there arose a powerful anti-slavery movement as Awakening preachers began, not only to offer salvation to individuals, but to attack the institution of slavery itself as sinful and evil in the sight of God.

Samuel Hopkins (1721–1803), for example, who had been tutored by Jonathan Edwards, was outraged by what he saw while pastoring in Newport, Rhode Island, an important hub in the transatlantic slave trade. He declared, “This whole country have their hands full of blood this day.”

Methodist, Baptist, Quaker, and Puritan preachers carried the fight against slavery even into the South and to slaveowners. This is what historian, Benjamin Hart, was referring to when he wrote, “Among the most ardent opponents of slavery were ministers, particularly the Puritan and revivalist preachers” (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 22).

This abolition movement gained momentum and eventually turned multitudes against slavery, including America’s founding fathers. It is part of this nation’s “sacred heritage” that Dr. King had come to cherish.

The First Continental Congress (1774)

The influence of the Great Awakening and the abolition movement it spawned, was obvious when the First Continental Congress met on September 5, 1774. The delegates opened with an extended time of Bible reading and prayer. They also began their proceedings each day with prayer led by Rev. Jacob Dusche, whom they invited to be their chaplain.

They had met out of great, widespread concern about the Intolerable Acts that had been imposed on the Colonies by the British. Now, British troops had been sent to enforce those Acts and had taken control of the city of Boston and closed its port. The situation was so oppressive that colonists had begun using the word “enslavement” for their situation.

The revivalist preacher, Samuel Hopkins, mentioned above, delivered a pamphlet to each member of the Congress challenging them and asking how they could complain about “enslavement” to Great Britain and ignore the “enslavement” of so many Africans in the Colonies.

Before they departed on October 26, the Congressional delegates passed a resolution saying the slave trade should be abolished and that nations engaged in it should be boycotted. This was at a time when slavery was accepted and practiced in most of the world. Historian, Christian M.  McBurney, called this ban on the slave trade “a stunning and radical move” and “the first nationally organized antislavery effort in American history, and one of the first in world history.”

At a time when slavery was accepted and practiced in most of the world, America’s founders were turning against it. This is part of our nation’s “sacred history.”

America’s Founders Turn Against Slavery

Dr. Thomas Sowell, who happens to be black, has written of the stunning turn of America’s founders against slavery at a time it was being practiced in most of the world. Even those Founders who owned slaves admitted that it was sinful and abhorrent in the sight of God. Sowell wrote,

Slavery was just not an issue, not even among intellectuals, much less among political leaders, until the 18th century–and then it was an issue only in Western civilization. Among those who turned against slavery in the 18th century were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and other American leaders. You could research all of 18th century Africa or Asia or the Middle East without finding any comparable rejection of slavery there (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 9). 

It was, of course, the Great Awakening, and the abolition movement that emerged from it, that turned multitudes in Colonial America, including the Founders, against slavery. Here are excerpts from their own testimony.

“There is not a man living who wishes more sincerely than I do, to see a plan adopted for the abolition of slavery.” – George Washington

“Every measure of prudence ought to be assumed for the eventual total extirpation of slavery from the United States . . . I have throughout my whole life held the practice of slavery in abhorrence.” – John Adams

“Slavery is an atrocious debasement of human nature and a source of serious evils.”  Benjamin Franklin

“Slavery is a lamentable evil as repugnant to humanity as it is inconsistent with the Bible and destructive of liberty.” Patrick Henry

Slavery is a Hydra sin and includes in it every violation of the precepts of the Law and the Gospels.” – Benjamin Rush

“It is our Duty therefore, both as free Citizens and Christians, not only to regard with compassion the injustice done to those among us who are held as slaves, but endeavor, by lawful ways and means, to enable them to share equally with us in that civil and religious Liberty with which an indulgent Providence has blessed these States; and to which these, our Brethren are by nature, as much entitled as ourselves. – Alexander Hamilton

“We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” – Thomas Jefferson

America’s founding generation understood the above words by Jefferson, and found in the Declaration of Independence, to be an attack on slavery and they were  commonly used by abolitionists in their fight against slavery.

America’s Founders were, in fact, at the forefront of the fight to end slavery at a time it was practiced in most of the world. This is a vital part of our “sacred heritage.”

America’s Colorblind Founding Documents (1787)

Because of the power of the Awakening and the anti-slavery sentiments it produced, America’s founding documents are colorblind. There are no classifications based on race or skin color and no mention of slaves or slavery. There is nothing in the founding documents to indicate that the rights guaranteed therein do not apply to every person.

The famous abolitionist and former slave, Frederick Douglas, understood this about the founding documents, and said, “Anyone of these provisions in the hands of abolition statesmen, and backed by a right moral sentiment, would put an end to slavery in America.”

Dr. King understood this and in his “I Have a Dream” speech, he declared, “I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.” He went on to say,

When the architects of our Republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Then quoting from the words of the Declaration of Independence, he proclaimed,

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.

For Dr. King, the problem was not with our founding documents. The problem was that Americans were not living up to the vision and ideals expressed in those founding documents. Americans were not living up to the “sacred heritage” the founding generation had passed along to us.

This is why each generation must be morally and spiritually renewed. A nation birthed out of a Great Awakening can only survive if succeeding generations are periodically renewed by such awakenings.

We Must Guard this Sacred Heritage

Karl Marx said, “People without a heritage are easily persuaded.” His statement explains why there are such vicious attacks today on America’s Founders. If the socialists/Marxists in our midst can destroy America’s “sacred heritage,” their goal of transforming America into a socialist/Marxist society will be made much easier.

This is why we must stand with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and save our nation’s “sacred heritage.” This is why we must ask God to visit this land once again with another great, national spiritual awakening.

America! America!
God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea!

This article is derived from Dr. Eddie Hyatt's books, Abolitionist Founding Fathers and 1726: The Year that Defined America, available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com

This was also a message delivered by Dr. Eddie Hyatt on July 4, 2021 at 
Rock Church International in Virginia Beach VA. The message can be found at this link.   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgIB5g6zgi4

6/21/2021

THIS FOUNDING FATHER HELPED LAUNCH ONE OF AMERICA'S GREAT BLACK CHURCHES

One of America’s Founding Fathers, Dr. Benjamin Rush, helped launch one of the most successful black denominations in America today. Rush (1745-1813) was a Philadelphia physician, member of the Continental Congress, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and served as Surgeon General during the Revolutionary War at George Washington’s request.

Rush was a passionate abolitionist who helped form the first Abolition society in America in his hometown of Philadelphia. He called slavery a “hydra sin” and called on the pastors and minsters of America to take a public stand against it. He wrote,

But chiefly—ye ministers of the gospel, whose dominion over the principles and actions of men is so universally acknowledged and felt, - Ye who estimate the worth of your fellow creatures by their immortality, and therefore must look upon all mankind as equal; - let your zeal keep pace with your opportunities to put a stop to slavery. While you enforce the duties of “tithe and cumin,” neglect not the weightier laws of justice and humanity. Slavery is a Hydra sin and includes in it every violation of the precepts of the Law and the Gospels (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 37-38).

Rush was very influential in turning many against slavery including other Founding Fathers. As Dr. Thomas Sowell wrote,

Among those who turned against slavery in the 18th century were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and other American leaders. You could research all of 18th century Africa or Asia or the Middle East without finding any comparable rejection of slavery there (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 9).

Rush became friends with the former slave and Methodist evangelist Richard Allen (1760-1831) who settled in Philadelphia after a time of successful evangelistic ministry to both black and white audiences. In fact, his ministry was so successful in bridging racial and cultural divides that that Paul Strand, former Washington D.C. correspondent for CBN, called Allen “America’s Black Founding Father.”

Being a Methodist preacher, Allen became a member of the Methodist Church in Philadelphia. However, as the Great Awakening, which had ignited the interracial currents in Colonial America, waned, the elders of the Methodist Church in Philadelphia decided to segregate their seating based on race. At this point, Allen and other blacks walked out.

Rush, a Presbyterian, came to their aid with both moral and financial support. He assisted them in obtaining property and erecting their own building in which to worship. They established Bethel Methodist Church out which came the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) denomination. Allen later wrote,

We had waited on Dr. Rush and Mr. Robert Ralston, and told them of our distressing situation. We considered it a blessing that the Lord had put it into our hearts to wait upon those gentlemen. They pitied our situation, and subscribed largely towards the church, and were very friendly towards us and advised us how to go on . . . Dr. Rush did much for us in public by his influence. I hope the name of Dr. Benjamin Rush and Mr. Robert Ralston will never be forgotten among us. They were the two first gentlemen who espoused the cause of the oppressed and aided us in building the house of the Lord for the poor Africans to worship in. Here was the beginning and rise of the first African church in America (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 27).

Think about it! One of America’s Founding Fathers helped launch of one of the largest and most respected black denominations in America today. The current "reframing" of America's founders as evil, racist slaveholders is a brazen distortion of history driven by a polticial/socialist agenda.

This article is derived from Dr. Eddie Hyatt’s latest book, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, available from Amazon and is website at www.eddiehyatt.com.

AMERICA'S ANTI-SLAVERY FOUNDING DOCUMENTS


America’s founding generation understood America’s founding documents to be, not only a declaration of independence from Great Britain, but also an attack on the institution of slavery. Frederick Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. also understood this.

When, for example, Dr. King was accused of being an extremist, he replied, "Was not Thomas Jefferson an extremist?” He then quoted Jefferson’s words from the Declaration of Independence, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal” (Hyatt, Abolitionist FoundingFathers, 45).

Indeed, in 1776, when slavery was accepted and practiced in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and throughout much of the world, these were the words of an extremist.

That these words were directed at the institution of slavery is plainly indicated by an early draft of the Declaration in which Jefferson attacked the King of England and accused him of introducing slavery into the Colonies. He wrote,

He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating them and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 44).

Although the above statement did not make it into the final draft, there is no question that the one that did make the final draft was a direct attack on the institution of slavery. Jefferson wrote,

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.

It is clear that America’s founding generation understood these words as an attack on slavery. For example, a 1784 gathering of Methodist leaders in Baltimore issued a statement in which they denounced slavery as “contrary to the golden rule of God . . . as well as every principle of the Revolution(Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 29).

The Awakening preacher, Samuel Hopkins (1721–1803), referred to these words of the Declaration in a pamphlet he wrote against slavery. Confronting those who argued that slavery was God’s way of bringing Africans from their pagan land to expose them to the Gospel, he exclaimed,

What sort of “gospel” message is being conveyed when people are enslaved because of the color of their skin? The Declaration of Independence says all men are created equal with certain unalienable rights. Oh, the shocking, the intolerable inconsistencies (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 30)!

Frederick Douglas (1818–1895), the former slave and famous abolitionist, understood the antislavery character of America’s founding documents and declared,

Anyone of these provisions in the hands of abolition statesmen, and backed by a right moral sentiment, would put an end to slavery in America (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 54-55).

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929–1968) understood this and in his stirring, I Have a Dream speech, he exhorted America, not to dispense with her founding documents, but instead, to live up to them. Speaking from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, he declared,

When the architects of our Republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

Then quoting from those same words of the Declaration of Independence, he proclaimed,

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

Abraham Lincoln also understood the anti-slavery character of the nation’s founding documents. In 1858, Lincoln, who had become the new Republican party’s first candidate for president, declared that the anti-slavery platform of the new party was the same as that of the nation’s Founders. He said,

In the way our Fathers originally left the slavery question, the institution was in the course of ultimate extinction, and the public mind rested in the belief that it was in the course of ultimate extinction. All I have asked or desired is that it should be placed back again upon the bases that the Fathers of our government originally placed it upon (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 59-60).

As documented in my books, Abolitionist Founding Fathers and 1726, a great, spiritual awakening in Colonial America turned multitudes, including America’s Founding Fathers, against slavery at a time it was practiced throughout the world. This then led to America’s colorblind founding documents with no classifications based on race and no mention of slaves or slavery.

This article is derived from Dr. Eddie Hyatt’s latest book, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.


6/10/2021

A "POPULIST UPRISING" IS COMING TO AMERICA

A few weeks ago, the phrase “Populist Uprising” was impressed on my mind. Since it is not a phrase that I use, I looked up “populist” and found that it refers to the people—to common, everyday people. I then knew that “uprising” referred to the common, everyday people rising up and letting their voices be heard. From that moment I knew that a “Populist Uprising” was coming to America.

A Government of "We the People"

The U.S. Constitution begins with the words, “We the people.” At the Constitutional Convention, the Founders saw themselves as working on behalf of the people they represented. They envisioned a nation governed, not by monarchs, oligarchs, or professional politicians, but by the people through their elected representatives and by making their voices heard in all sorts of public venues.

Because they wanted a government of the people, the Founders instituted the Bill of Rights, the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution, to protect the rights of the people. The First Amendment guarantees, not only freedom of religion, but also freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to peaceably assemble, and the freedom to petition the government for a redress of grievances. 

The Founders instituted the freedoms necessary for "we the people" to make our voices heard.

We Must Break the Silence

Thomas Jefferson said, “All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” Where the light does not shine, darkness prevails. When “we the people” are silent, evil gains the upper hand. 

It is time for people of good faith to arise and let their voices be heard. I am not talking here about a political uprising, but an uprising of godliness, morality, and truth. It is what Jesus called "letting our light shine." 

We can begin by praying for another Great Awakening across our land. A strong moral and Christian presence is necessary for maintaining our Constitutional freedoms, for as John Adams said,

Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inaequate for the government of any other. (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 64).

We Must Return to the Old Paths

Each new generation likes to think that wisdom and virtue has begun with it. In so many cases, the opposite is true, as is the case in America today and was the case in Israel during the time of Jeremiah the prophet.

During a time of moral decline, social unrest, and enemies at their gates, God gave Israel the answer through Jeremiah. In Jeremiah 6:16, the prophet declared to King Josiah and all the people,

Thus says the LORD: “Stand in the ways and see, and ask for the old paths, where the good way is, and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls.

Just as Israel, in the time of Jeremiah, had strayed from the good way that had produced peace and prosperity, America has strayed from the way that made her, perhaps, the freest and most prosperous nation in history.

The new “woke” philosophies of transgenderism, the “1619 Project,” and Critical Race Theory are dividing and destroying this country. We must return to the “old paths”—to those founding principles that made America great. 

"We the people" must rise up and take a stand for commonsense, righteousness, and truth.

It’s Time to Stand for Truth

In my latest book, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, I show how both Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. based their fights for abolition and racial justice on the “old paths” laid out by America’s founders. America’s founders were impacted by a "Great Awakening" and turned against slavery at a time when it was accepted throughout the world. They formed a new nation built on godly principles of self-government and the Biblical truth that,

All men are created equal and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights such as Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.

This is the key for this generation. "We the people" must rise up and stand for those founding principles on which this nation was founded. They are principles that will work wherever and whenever they are implemented, for they are ubiquitous, eternal, and godly in nature.

Let the “Populist Uprising” begin!

This article is derived from Dr. Eddie Hyatt’s bombshell new book, Abolitionist Founding Fathers with the subtitle, Sin, Slavery and Redemption at America’s Founding. The book is available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.