8/05/2022

CHARLES FINNEY SAID THESE 3 ATTITUDES WILL HINDER AND DESTROY REVIVAL IN AMERICA

According to the Pew Research Center, Christianity in America is declining at an alarming rate. In the 1990s 86% of Americans identified themselves as Christian. By 2007 that number had dropped to 78.4% and only 7 years later, in 2014, it had dropped another 6% to 70.6%. By 2021 it had dropped another 7 percentage points to 63%.

During the same period, the percentage of Americans who describe themselves as atheist, agnostic, or “nothing in particular” has increased dramatically. From 2007 to 2021 their number jumped from 16% to 29%. Also, the number of Americans who identify with non-Christian faiths has grown, especially among Muslims and Hindus.

These facts should provoke us to ask, “Why?” Why is this happening despite all our mega churches and conferences, our new apostolic order, our prayers and intercessions, our prophetic declarations, and our revivals?

Charles G. Finney (1792-1875, known as the “prince of revivalists,” has something to say to us in this regard. Finney saw entire communities transformed by the revivals he spearheaded, and he wrote extensively on the subject.

Whereas today we tend to look for a better method or different strategy for producing a revival, Finney would say we need to examine the attitude of our hearts and consider our motives. Here are three attitudes that Finney says will hinder and destroy revival.

Attitude #1

When Christians Seek Revival from Selfish Motives

The Pharisees did a lot of good things—praying, fasting, tithing—but were on the receiving end of the most severe rebukes from Jesus. He rebuked them, not for “what” they did, but for “why” they did it. Their self-righteous, prideful motives were abhorrent to the Lord.

This is true when it comes to revival. Are we seeking revival from pure motives-- to see God’s kingdom advanced and souls come to Christ--or do we want revival for our own personal advancement and success?

During the revivals of the 1990s, a pastor told how God revealed to him his selfish motive in praying for revival. He was going to his church each morning at 6 am and praying for revival. One morning the Holy Spirit brought another church in his city to mind and asked, “What if I choose to begin the revival for which you are praying in this congregation.” He replied, “Lord, you wouldn’t!”

Finney told of how he encountered so many pastors and churches wanting revival for very personal and selfish reasons. Some wanted revival to increase their numbers so they could build a new and larger building. Others wanted revival because they felt competitive with another church in the community and wanted to raise their status and visibility. Finney said,

I have had a multitude of letters and requests that I would visit such and such places, and endeavor to promote a revival, and many reasons have been urged why I should go. But when I came to weigh their reasons, I have sometimes found every one of them to be selfish. And God would look upon every one with abhorrence.

Attitude #2
When Christians Get Proud of Their Revival

One danger that must be guarded against in times of revival is the temptation to become proud and puffed up about “our” revival. Throughout history, revivals have come to an end because ministers and churches got an inflated idea of their own importance because of God’s blessing on their lives.

Instead of nurturing a humility and thanking God for His mercy and grace in sending them a revival, they have begun to think that there must be something special about themselves. They think, “We must be a notch above other Christians and churches, for look how God is blessing us.”

This is dangerous for as I Peter 5:5b says, God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble. Finney warned his generation to be on guard against this revival-killing attitude, saying,

Perhaps it has been published in the papers what a revival there has been in that church, so they think how high they will stand in the estimation of other churches all over the land because they have had such a great revival. And so they get puffed up and vain, and they can no longer enjoy the presence of God. The Spirit withdraws from them and the revival ceases.

Attitude #3
When Christians Do Not Feel Their Dependence on the Holy Spirit

When we begin to think that by our own gifts and talents we can produce a revival, true revival will evade us. We may produce hyped religious events and emotional highs, but we will not see a genuine, heaven-sent revival.

During a prayer drive along the east coast in which we passed through many of the cities transformed in the Great Awakening, I heard the Holy Spirit say, “You can fake it, but you can’t make it.”

Finney addressed this issue head on, describing what happens when ministers and churches begin depending on their own talents and strengths to produce a revival. He said,

Whenever they get strong in their own strength, God curses their blessings. In many instances they sin against their own mercies because they get lifted up with their success, and take credit to themselves, and do not give the glory to God. There is doubtless a great temptation to this and requires the utmost watchfulness on the part of ministers and churches, to guard against it, and not to grieve the Spirit away by vain glorying in men.

The Way Forward from Here

No, we do not need a new method, means, or strategy to see another Great Awakening. We need a new attitude of heart. It is a time to cast our crowns, titles, and proud achievements before His throne and acknowledge that we are nothing apart from His mercy and grace. It is a time to remember Isaiah 66:2 where God reminded His people,

These are the ones I look on with favor: those who are humble and contrite [broken] in spirit, and who tremble at my word (NIV).

It is not too late for America. If we will take seriously His call to humility and prayer, we could yet see a turn-around that will astound us all—a turn-around initiated, not from Washington D.C., but from the throne of God.

If My people who are called by My name will humble themselves, and pray and seek My face, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin and heal their land.

Dr. Eddie Hyatt is a recognized expert on revivals in history and his book, 2000 Years of Charismatic Christianity, is used as a textbook in colleges and seminaries around he world. He has written several books on America's birth out of the Great Awakening, including 1726: The Year that Defined America, available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.






7/30/2022

WHAT MUST HAPPEN FOR THE AMERICAN EAGLE TO SOAR ONCE AGAIN

In 1776, the American eagle took flight and soared on the two wings of faith and reason. Now, 246 years later, the American eagle seems to be plummeting to her death, her two wings frayed and torn by a woke generation that is hostile to both faith and reason. Reason may also be referred to as "common sense."

In the European Enlightenment (1685-1815), Christian faith was rejected and in its place “reason” was exalted as the vehicle for discovering truth. However, because Christianity is a reasonable faith, based on verifiable historical events, the practical worldview of the person of the Enlightenment was often quite compatible with that of the person of faith. This was especially true on the American continent.

Colonial America was influenced by the Enlightenment, but because of the Great Awakening (1726-70) and its emphasis on faith in Christ, faith and reason existed comfortably side by side in America. This is why Benjamin Franklin, a self-proclaimed Deist, could have such a close friendship with the fiery young Methodist revivalist, George Whitefield.

Benjamin Franklin Merged Faith and Reason

Because he saw no real dichotomy between faith and reason, Franklin entered a business partnership with Whitefield in which he printed and distributed thousands of Whitefield’s sermons and journals. In doing so, he helped spread the Great Awakening throughout the Colonies. Franklin also contributed financially to Whitefield’s ministry and the two carried on a lively correspondence for over thirty years.

So close was the relationship between this older Deist and fiery, young evangelist, that in 1756 Franklin wrote a letter to Whitefield proposing that they partner together in establishing a new colony in the wilderness area of present-day Ohio. He wrote,

I imagine we could do it effectually and without putting the nation at too much expense. What a glorious thing it would be, to settle in that fine country a large strong body of religious and industrious people (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 136)!

Franklin’s worldview, based on reason, was obviously very close to that of Whitefield, which was based on faith in Christ and Scripture. Indeed, one Enlightenment philosopher, John Locke, who was widely read by America’s founders, saw no dichotomy between faith and reason and wrote a book entitled The Reasonableness of Christianity.

Thomas Jefferson Merged Faith and Reason

Thomas Jefferson, another founder impacted by the Enlightenment, also saw no dichotomy between faith and reason. For example, he considered it a reasonable and wise act to take money from the federal treasury to pay for a Christian missionary to the Kaskaskia Indians of Southern Illinois, and to build them a chapel in which to worship. Reason informed him that it would improve their lives and make them a happier people.

Reason also led him to a high regard for Jesus Christ, which is why he closed presidential documents with the phrase “In the year of our Lord Christ.” Reason also led him to declare, “Of all the systems of morality that have come under my observations, none appear to me so pure as that of Jesus” (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 150).

The merger of reason and Biblical faith is seen in America’s founding documents. In the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson wrote, “We hold these truth to be self-evident, that all men are created equal and that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights . . ..”

By using the phrase “self-evident” Jefferson is acknowledging that some truths are obvious from nature, reason, and common sense. He brings faith into the equation when he says that all men are “created” equal and are endowed by their “Creator” with certain unalienable rights.

The merger of faith and reason at America’s founding led the noted philosopher and historian, Michael Novak, to say,

Everywhere that reason led, Americans found the Bible. If they read Francis Bacon, they found the Bible. If they read Isaac Newton or John Milton, they found the Bible. In Shakespeare, they found the Bible. In the world of the founders, the Bible was an unavoidable and useful rod of measurement, a stimulus to intellectual innovation (Hyatt, 5 Pillars of the American Republic, 16).

The Present Danger We Face

Here is the danger we face today. Whereas there was a rejection of Christian faith in the Enlightenment, society could still function tolerably well because of the emphasis on reason. After all, God is a reasonable Being who created a reasonable world wherein truth can be discovered by using the reasoning faculties He has given us.

This generation, however, has gone a step beyond the Enlightenment and rejected, not only God, but also reason. There are no common sense, "self-evident" truths for this generation. Objective truth and reality do not exist and therefore cannot be discovered. They are to be created according to "my" whims and desires.  

With neither faith or reason to guide them, this new generation cannot define a woman, they believe men can have babies, women can be fathers, and that small children should be given the opportunity to choose their gender.

Without faith or reason to guide them, what matters to this woke generation is how “I” feel at any given moment. If I am a man and decide to identify as a woman, the whole world should accommodate “my” decision, no matter how it affects anyone else. 

Such an egocentric, narcissistic mindset can only lead to societal upheaval and anarchy. Without the two wings of faith and reason, the American eagle is in a freefall. We are not, however, without hope!

Restoring the Two Wings to the American Eagle

Like no other time, we must see those two wings of faith and reason restored to the American eagle. Each of us can play a part by boldly standing for God, reason, and common sense. I also invite you to join me and thousands of others in praying for another Great Awakening to roll across this land like a giant tsunami wave.

Dr. Eddie Hyatt is a Bible teacher and historian with a passion to see America return to her founding principles of faith and freedom. This article is derived from his book, 1726: The Year that Defined America, available from Amazon and his website at http://eddiehyatt.com.



7/11/2022

THOMAS JEFFERSON'S PROMINENT ROLE IN ENDING SLAVERY IN AMERICA

Thomas Jefferson is in the crosshairs of those on the Left who are demanding the removal of his statues from public places and the removal of his name from public schools. Interestingly, however, the nation's most famous Abolitionist and most celebrated Civil Rights leader would both disagree.

We must remember that the goal of the Left is not to understand history. Their goal is to control history and manipulate it to further their social/political agenda. In George Orwell's classic book, 1984, Big Brother censored, manipulated, and demonized the past to make his own authoritarian regime appear to be a welcome improvement on the past. And so it is with all secularist, authoritarian movements. 

The truth is that at a time when slavery was accepted and practiced in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and most of the world, Jefferson, and virtually all of America’s Founders turned against it. This is clear from both their public statements and their private correspondence. The eminent economist and historian, Dr. Thomas Sowell, who happens to be Black, has written of this, saying, 

Among those who turned against slavery in the 18th century were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and other American leaders. You could research all of 18th century Africa or Asia or the Middle East without finding any comparable rejection of slavery there (Hyatt, 1726: TheYear that Defined America, 90).

The occasion for this unique turn was the 18th century religious movement in colonial America known as the Great Awakening. A characteristic of this Awakening was the anti-slavery sentiments that prevailed throughout the colonies. By the time of the writing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776, virtually every Founder had come to agree with John Adams who said,

Every measure of prudence ought to be assumed for the eventual total extirpation of slavery from the United States . . . I have throughout my whole life held the practice of slavery in abhorrence (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 36).

Jefferson was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence and the nation’s third president. Although born in a slave-holding colony and into a slave-holding family, he came to see the evils of slavery and began calling for its elimination, even while holding slaves.

For example, in a document for Virginia delegates to the Continental Congress, Jefferson called for an end to the slave trade, writing, "The abolition of domestic slavery is the great object of desire in these colonies where it was unhappily introduced in our infant state."

In an early draft of the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson excoriated the King of England and accused him of introducing slavery into the colonies, saying,

He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating them and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 44).

Although the exact words of the above statement did not make it to the final draft, the principles of “life and liberty” for “all men” did. Jefferson wrote,

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.

America’s founding generation understood this statement to be a direct attack on the institution of slavery, and abolitionists used it in their attacks on that institution. The famous abolitionist and former slave, Frederick Douglass (1818-95), understood it as such. In a July 4th speech in 1852, Douglass spoke glowingly of the Declaration of Independence and exhorted his audience,

The principles contained in that instrument are saving principles. Stand by those principles, be true to them on all occasions, in all places, against all foes, and at whatever cost.

In his early years Douglass had concluded that he had no part in America because of the enslavement of his people; but after years of investigative research he completely changed his thinking. He realized that the continuation of slavery was not the desire of the Founders and that they had put their lives on the line by declaring independence from Great Britain and challenging slavery by declaring that "all men are created equal" and have a God-given right for Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. 

That is why, in the same speech, Douglass showed his high esteem for Jefferson and all the Founders, saying,

Fellow Citizens, I am not wanting in respect for the fathers of this republic. The signers of the Declaration of Independence were brave men. They were great men too—great enough to give fame to a great age. It does not often happen to a nation to raise, at one time, such a number of truly great men (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 52).

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. also understood Jefferson’s words in the Declaration to be an attack on slavery. When someone suggested to him that he was an “extremist,” King replied, "Was not Thomas Jefferson an extremist? – ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal’" (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 45).

Indeed, in the 18th century, when slavery was accepted and practiced throughout the world, the words of Jefferson were considered “extreme.”  When understood in the context of the times, Jefferson and America’s Founders were on the cutting edge of human society in advocating for the abolition of slavery, and proclaiming liberty for all mankind.

This is why, in his iconic “I Have a Dream Speech,” Dr. King could declare, “I still have a dream; it is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.” In the same speech he went on to say,

When the architects of our Republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

Dr. King made it clear that the problem the nation faced was not with the Founders or her founding documents, but with the fact that succeeding generations had not lived up to the vision of equality and liberty the Founders had enshrined in those documents.

Abraham Lincoln also believed that succeeding generations had failed to follow through on the vision of the Founders for life and liberty for all men. In 1858, Lincoln, who had become the newly formed Republican party’s first candidate for president, declared that the anti-slavery vision of the new party was the same as that of the nation’s Founders. He said,

In the way our Fathers originally left the slavery question, the institution was in the course of ultimate extinction, and the public mind rested in the belief that it was in the course of ultimate extinction. All I have asked or desired is that it should be placed back again upon the bases that the Fathers of our government originally placed it upon (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 59-60).

If the new emerging generation is to experience American freedom, there must be a return to the nation's founding principles. Pope John Paul II, although Polish, understood this. In a 1997 speech welcoming the new U.S. ambassador to the Vatican, he  said,  

The continuing success of American democracy depends on the degree to which each new generation, native-born and immigrant, is willing to make its own the moral truths on which the Founding Fathers staked the future of your Republic (Hyatt, Pilgrims and Patriots, 2nd Edition, 156).

This article is derived from the books, Abolitionist Founding Fathers and 1726: The Year that Defined America, by Dr. Eddie Hyatt, who has a calling and commission to point America back to her birth out of a great 18th century Christian Awakening. These and other books by him are available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com

6/30/2022

DOES AMERICA HAVE A SACRED HERITAGE? DR. KING THOUGHT SO!

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. believed there was something holy and sacred about America’s founding. He obviously considered the Jim Crow south, where he lived and worked, to be a sharp departure from America’s founding vision. Writing in 1963 from the Birmingham city jail, Dr. King declared,

Our destiny is tied up with the destiny of America . . . We will win our freedom because the SACRED HERITAGE of our nation and the eternal will of God are embodied in our echoing demands.

Frederick Douglass (1816-1895), the former slave and passionate abolitionist, came to the same conclusion 100 years before Dr. King. In his early years, Douglass felt he had no part in America; but after years of investigation and research he completely changed his thinking. In a July 4th speech in 1852, Douglass called the U.S. Constitution “a glorious liberty document,” and declared,

Fellow Citizens, I am not wanting in respect for the fathers of this republic. The signers of the Declaration of Independence were brave men. They were great men too—great enough to give fame to a great age. It does not often happen to a nation to raise, at one time, such a number of truly great men.

Like King, Douglass discovered that at a time when slavery was accepted and practiced in most of the world, America’s founders took a bold stand against it. As the eminent Black scholar, Dr. Thomas Sowell, has said,

Slavery was just not an issue, not even among intellectuals, much less among political leaders, until the 18th century–and then it was an issue only in Western civilization. Among those who turned against slavery in the 18th century were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and other American leaders. You could research all of 18th century Africa or Asia or the Middle East without finding any comparable rejection of slavery there (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 90).

History shows that it was a great Christian Awakening (1726-1770) in Colonial America that breached racial and cultural barriers and unleashed anti-slavery outrage throughout the Colonies. This Awakening resulted in virtually every Founding Father, even those who owned slaves, taking a public stand against it.

By the time of the writing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the Constitution in 1787, virtually every Founder agreed with John Adams, America’s 2nd president, who declared,

Every measure of prudence ought to be assumed for the eventual total extirpation of slavery from the United States. I have throughout my whole life held the practice of slavery in abhorrence (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 36).

As a result, America’s founders formulated founding documents that contain no classifications based on race or skin color. The words “slave” and “slavery” are nowhere to be found. Instead, the Constitution speaks of “citizens,” “persons,” and “other persons.”

Indeed, America’s founding generation understood America’s founding documents to be anti-slavery documents. Douglass came to this realization and wrote, “Anyone of these provisions in the hands of abolition statesmen, and backed by a right moral sentiment, would put an end to slavery in America” (Hyatt, Abolitionist Founding Fathers, 54-55).

Dr. King understood this original American dream of faith and freedom, which is why, in his iconic “I Have a Dream Speech,” he could say, “I still have a dream; it is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.” He then declared,

When the architects of our Republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

Dr. King made it clear that the problem the nation faced was not with her founding documents, but with the fact that succeeding generations had not lived up to the vision of equality and liberty the Founders had enshrined in those documents. He went on to say, 

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

In my book, 1726: The Year that Defined America, I have shown how the Great Awakening (1726-70) revitalized Christian faith throughout the colonies, ignited an anti-slavery movement, and had a direct bearing on the founding of the nation and the formulation of her colorblind, anti-slavery founding documents. 

Dr. King obviously knew this, which is why he did not rail against America's Founders, but sought to build on their legacy and the "Sacred Heritage" that they left. Let's pray that this current "woke" generation will learn from him and follow his example. 

This article is derived from Dr. Eddie Hyatt’s books, 1726: The Year that Defined America and Abolitionist Founding Fathers, available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.

6/27/2022

THE PRAYERS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON AND THE BIRTHING OF AMERICA

As he was preparing to leave home as a young soldier, George Washington’s mother, Mary Ball Washington, exhorted him, “Remember that God is our only sure trust.”  She also urged him, “My son, neglect not the duty of secret prayer” (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 131).

The evidence is overwhelming that Washington remembered and carried out his mother’s exhortations. It is obvious that prayer played a prominent role in his life and in the birthing of the United States of America.

Prayer As a Young Man

In April of 1891, several of Washington’s descendants, including Lawrence Washington, Bushrod Washington, and Thomas B. Washington, sold a collection of his personal items at auction in Philadelphia. Among the items was a little book filled with daily prayers in Washington’s own handwriting when he was in his twenties.

Entitled, Daily Sacrifice, these prayers are deeply devotional and evangelical in nature. For example, the first entry reads, in part,

Let my heart, therefore, gracious God, be so affected with the glory and majesty of Thine honor that I may not do my own works, but wait on Thee, and discharge those duties which Thou requirest of me.

The following Monday morning, his prayer reads,

Direct my thoughts, words and work, wash away my sins in the immaculate blood of the Lamb, and purge my heart by Thy Holy Spirit . . . daily frame me more and more in the likeness of Thy Son Jesus Christ.

Also, of note is his prayer:

Bless, O Lord, the whole race of mankind, and let the world be filled with the knowledge of Thee and Thy Son, Jesus Christ (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 132).

Prayer in Time of War

It is obvious that Washington continued to be a person of prayer. For example, after accepting the call of the Continental Congress to serve as Commander-in-Chief of the Colonial army, one of his first actions was to issue an order that each day was to begin with prayer led by the officers if each unit. He also ordered that each soldier, unless their duties required them to be elsewhere, was to observe “a punctual attendance of Divine services, to implore the blessing of heaven upon the means used for our safety and public defense.”

That Washington himself was a person of prayer in his private life was confirmed by Isaac Potts, who lived near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania where the American Army was quartering under much duress during the winter of 1774-75. Potts was a Quaker and a pacifist who opposed the war until he had a life-changing experiencing while riding through the woods one day during, perhaps, the bleakest period of the war. He said,

I heard a plaintive sound as, of a man at prayer. I tied my horse to a sapling and went quietly into the woods and to my astonishment I saw the great George Washington on his knees alone, with his sword on one side and his cocked hat on the other. He was at Prayer to the God of the Armies, beseeching to interpose with his Divine aid, as it was ye Crisis, and the cause of the country, of humanity and of the world. Such a prayer I never heard from the lips of man. I left him alone praying. I went home and told my wife I saw a sight and heard today what I never saw or heard before, and just related to her what I had seen and heard and observed. We never thought a man could be a soldier and a Christian, but if there is one in the world, it is Washington (Hyatt, 1726: The Yearthat Defined America, 115-16).

Washington’s Earnest Prayer for the New Nation

Washington prevailed in prayer. Against overwhelming odds, the ragtag Colonial army defeated the mighty British war machine. The British general, Cornwallis, surrendered his entire army to Washington on October 19, 1781.

Having completed his mission, Washington issued a letter of resignation as commander-in-chief to the Continental Congress. He then wrote what could be described as a pastoral letter, dated June 14, 1783, to the governors of the various states. This letter included his “earnest prayer” that is here quoted in part. He wrote,

I now make it my earnest prayer that God would have you, and the State over which you preside, in his holy protection; that he would incline the hearts of the citizens . . .  to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another . . . and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of mind, which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, and without a humble imitation of His example in these things, we can never hope to be a happy nation (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America, 120).

President Washington Prays

After being sworn in as the nation’s first president with his hand on a Bible, Washington presented his first inaugural address, which was filled with references to God. After the ceremony, held in New York City, Washington and Congress proceeded to St. Paul’s chapel where they participated in a prayer and worship service. 

Shortly after assuming the presidency, Washington proclaimed a National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving. In the proclamation, he gave the reason for the Day of Prayer, saying,

That we may unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the Great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national sins and other transgressions, to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually, to render our national government a blessing to all people, by constantly being a government of wise, just and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed (Hyatt, 1726:The Year that Defined America, 134).

Praying to the Very End

That Washington continued to be devout in his latter years was confirmed by his nephew Robert Lewis, who lived with Washington and served as his private secretary during the first part of his presidency. Lewis said he had accidentally witnessed Washington’s private devotions in his library both morning and evening. On those occasions he saw Washington kneeling with a Bible open before him. Lewis understood this to be Washington’s daily practice.

Mason Locke Weems (1759-1825), who wrote the first biography of Washington after his death, says that he died with a prayer on his lips. Describing Washington's passing, Weems says, "He closes his eyes with his own hands, folds his arms decently on his breast, and then breathing out, 'Father of mercies, take me to Thyself,' he falls asleep." 

An Example to Follow

Yes, our first president was unashamedly a devout person of prayer. There is no question that his prayer life played a primary role in the birthing of America. Modern presidents and politicians would be wise to follow his example.  

This article was derived from Dr. Eddie Hyatt's book, 1726: The Year that Defined America, available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.

6/25/2022

OVERTURNING ROE VS. WADE WAS A WIN FOR AMERICAN DEMOCRACY

The overturning of Roe vs. Wade was a great victory, not only on Moral grounds, but also on Constitutional grounds. It was a momentous victory for American democracy.

America's founders formed a government, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, "of the people, by the people, and for the people." But almost 50 years ago, 7 liberal justices took the abortion issue out of the hands of the people and arbitrarily made abortion rights the law of the land. 

Friday’s ruling does not ban abortion but merely puts that decision back into the hands of "we the people" where it belongs and where our Founders intended it to be.

America’s Founders instituted a legislative branch, consisting of representatives elected by the people, who would make the laws of the land. They never intended for laws to be made by unelected judges legislating from the bench as was the case with Roe vs. Wade.

They instituted an executive branch, which would be responsible for enforcing the laws enacted by the people’s representatives. They instituted a Judicial branch that would have the responsibility of interpreting and applying those same laws to individual cases brought before them.

In recent decades, liberal judges have legislated from the bench and enacted laws for which "we the people" have had little or no say. This is not American democracy. This is oligarchy, i.e., rule by a few. America's founders would be horrified.

Those Supreme Court justices who just overturned Roe vs. Wade should be applauded by all who believe in American democracy, whether prolife or proabortion. They have returned power to the people, preserved America’s Constitutional form of government, and given new hope for the nation’s future.

Dr. Eddie Hyatt is a historian and biblical scholar who has written extensively about America's overt Christian origins out of the First Great Awakening. His books are available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.


6/19/2022

WHY MAYRA FLORES REPRESENTS AMERICA'S BEST HOPE FOR THE FUTURE

In a December 1997 speech welcoming the new American ambassador to the Vatican, Pope John II acknowledged the founding of America on moral principles rooted in the Judeo-Christian faith. He then emphasized the critical importance of those same moral principles being continued by succeeding generations, saying,

The continuing success of American democracy depends on the degree to which each new generation, native-born and immigrant, is willing to make its own the moral truths on which the Founding Fathers staked the future of your Republic (Hyatt, Pilgrims and Patriots, 2nd Edition, 156).

The newly elected Congresswoman from south Texas, Mayra Flores, exudes those moral principles mentioned by John Paul and implemented by America’s Founding Fathers. In a traditional Democrat district that is 84% Hispanic, Flores ran as a Republican on a platform emphasizing faith in God and commonsense, moral solutions to the nation’s problems.

Mayra, who is the first Mexican-born member of Congress, came to America at the age of 6 with her migrant parents who were farmworkers. She acquired her citizenship at the age of 14 and graduated from South Texas College in 2019. She says she became active in the Republican party when she realized that the Democrat Party did not support the values of faith and family on which she had been raised.

Indeed, in 2019 the Democrat National Committee (DNC), the governing body of the Democrat Party, unanimously passed a resolution affirming atheism and declaring that neither Christianity nor any religion is necessary for morality and patriotism.

So, while many American-born citizens, including politicians, are rejecting America’s Judeo-Christian founding, Mayra is pointing the nation back to those founding principles that brought about the end of slavery and Jim Crow, defeated Nazi Germany, and brought down the evil Soviet Empire (Hyatt, 1726: The Year that Defined America89-104).

Mayra, therefore, represents a ray of hope for America because she shares the same ubiquitous and eternal values as America’s founders. The Judeo-Christian principles of freedom on which this nation was founded transcend ethnicity and skin color. They will work anywhere because they are rooted in eternal, transcendent truth.

It may be that America’s best hope for the future lies with foreign-born immigrants like Mayra Flores who understand what it really means to be “American.”

Dr. Eddie L. Hyatt is an author, historian, and Bible teacher. He has documented America’s birth out of a great, spiritual awakening in his books 1726: The Year that Defined America and Pilgrims and Patriots 2nd Edition. These books and others are available from Amazon and his website at www.eddiehyatt.com.